Pops of color aren’t the only changes coming to M Circle

By Brenda Wintrode Landscapers planted winter-hardy yellow pansies at the M Circle last week, replacing the red begonias and marking the last time workers would make this change before it moves to its new location in the spring.  The new M will sit in front of Mitchell Hall to make way for the Purple Line track being installed along Campus Drive. “We’re delighted that it … Continue reading Pops of color aren’t the only changes coming to M Circle

UMD Students are still “Feeling the Bern”

By James Cirrone  As the 2020 primary heats up, Terps for Bernie 2020 is working overtime to get Sen. Bernie Sanders elected president. The campus organization held a “Plan to Win Party” on Monday night to strategize with fellow supporters and let them know how they can become actively involved. On the Terps for Bernie website, the group says they are “building a movement at … Continue reading UMD Students are still “Feeling the Bern”

Bus loop relocation confuses riders at College Park Metro as Purple Line construction begins

By Brenda Wintrode Bus riders outside the College Park Metro station Wednesday weren’t sure where to wait for their bus. Construction began on Sept. 1 to rearrange the bus loop on the station’s east side to make way for the incoming Purple Line light rail train. All bus stops have been temporarily relocated along River Road. The project is one of six Purple Line construction sites … Continue reading Bus loop relocation confuses riders at College Park Metro as Purple Line construction begins

Students prepare for the upcoming flu season

By Sarah Natchipolsky  Nothing strikes fear into the heart of a college student like the sound of a roommate or classmate coughing and sneezing. And this flu season, college students in particular need to be proactive in their disease prevention efforts. “Being in crowded places such as dining halls, restaurants, classrooms, gyms and parties increases anyone’s risk of contracting seasonal illnesses such as the flu,” … Continue reading Students prepare for the upcoming flu season

Vaping: an ‘epidemic’ affecting UMD students daily

By Shauneen Miranda Vaping has dominated youth culture, and regardless of recent reports on related lung diseases and even death, some University of Maryland students continue to use Juuls and other forms of e-cigarettes.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 500 vaping-related incidents have occurred throughout the U.S. and the Virgin Islands. Seven people have reportedly died from lung diseases related … Continue reading Vaping: an ‘epidemic’ affecting UMD students daily

“Free Angela and Political Prisoners” educates audience on prolific activist

By Vanessa Reis Nonprofit organization Current Movements hosted a screening of Shola Lynch’s Free Angela and Political Prisoners Saturday night at the Eaton Workshop in Washington, D.C., documenting Angela Davis’ transformation into a revolutionary icon in this film directed by Shola Lynch. According to their Facebook page, Current Movements aims to connect grassroots activists, movements and organizations through art, film and technology. This screening marked … Continue reading “Free Angela and Political Prisoners” educates audience on prolific activist

“A Bold Peace” screening sheds light on Costa Rican history

By Vanessa Reis Students who gathered in South Campus Commons last Monday night to watch the screening of “A Bold Peace: Costa Rica’s Path of Demilitarization” learned about the journey that led Costa Ricans to be some of the happiest people on the planet. It’s true: Costa Rica ranks No. 1 in the Happy Planet Index, a site that measures how well nations are doing … Continue reading “A Bold Peace” screening sheds light on Costa Rican history

BDS bill rejected after lengthy debate

By Vanessa Reis  On Wednesday, April 25, the Student Government Association (SGA) shot down a proposed bill which, if passed, would have resulted in the university no longer investing in a list of companies that have been accused of contributing to human rights violations against Palestinians. After five hours of debate, the bill was rejected in a 25-9 vote. More than 100 students took the … Continue reading BDS bill rejected after lengthy debate

Fifth Annual Symposium on Environmental Justice explores role of pollution in inequality

By Vanessa Reis The university’s school of public health held its fifth annual Symposium on Environmental Justice and Health Disparities at Stamp Student Union Saturday. A number of panels discussed the usage of litigation as a tool for environmental and social change. One panel in particular discussed the impacts of President Donald Trump’s environmental policies and how to combat these policies through litigation. “What we’re … Continue reading Fifth Annual Symposium on Environmental Justice explores role of pollution in inequality

Philanthropist and professor shares three decades of insight in new book

By David DeWeaver In the summer of 1990, before “self-care” became a catchphrase, 22-year-old Alex Counts saw first-hand what burnout looked like. He was in Washington, D.C. working as the legislative director for an anti-hunger advocacy nonprofit called RESULTS. It was, in his words, “a preposterously senior role” for someone who’d just graduated from college the year prior. So it made sense that on a … Continue reading Philanthropist and professor shares three decades of insight in new book